$450.00

Lothar Gunther Buchheim (* 1918 † 2007)
Title: Untitled
Color lithograph
Year: 1968
Size: 24.0 × 16.8 inches

1 in stock

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Lothar-Günther Buchheim (February 6, 1918 – February 22, 2007) was a German author and painter. He is best known for his 1973 novel The Boat (Das Boot), which became an international bestseller and was adapted in 1981 as an Oscar-nominated film.

After the war, Buchheim worked as an artist, art collector, gallery owner, art auctioneer and art publisher. Through the 1950s and 1960s, he established an art publishing house, and he wrote books on Georges Braque, Max Beckmann, Otto Mueller and Pablo Picasso. He collected works by French and German Expressionist artists, from groups including Die Brücke and Der Blaue Reiter, such as Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Max Pechstein, Emil Nolde, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Franz Marc, Gabriele Münter, Alexej von Jawlensky, and Max Beckmann. These works had been derided as “degenerate” during the Nazi period, and he was able to buy them cheaply.

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Lothar-Günther Buchheim (February 6, 1918 – February 22, 2007) was a German author and painter. He is best known for his 1973 novel The Boat (Das Boot), which became an international bestseller and was adapted in 1981 as an Oscar-nominated film.

After the war, Buchheim worked as an artist, art collector, gallery owner, art auctioneer and art publisher. Through the 1950s and 1960s, he established an art publishing house, and he wrote books on Georges Braque, Max Beckmann, Otto Mueller and Pablo Picasso. He collected works by French and German Expressionist artists, from groups including Die Brücke and Der Blaue Reiter, such as Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Max Pechstein, Emil Nolde, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Franz Marc, Gabriele Münter, Alexej von Jawlensky, and Max Beckmann. These works had been derided as “degenerate” during the Nazi period, and he was able to buy them cheaply.