Amy Young

Amy Young

Amy Young: “Much of my studio practice is multidisciplinary and consistently informed by the many mediums from which I’m developing pieces. Whether a piece is mixing mediums, or mixing methodology, each individual piece dictates itself through the act of creating. I remain curious of various eras and styles of artistic expression. My work is informed by narratives, both personal and collective, and the way in which the stories are conveyed, but the overall inspiration that weaves my work together derives from psychology.”

Muriel Hansen

Muriel Hansen

Muriel Hansen: “Growing up camping in northern Wisconsin, I became enthralled with nature from an early age. I loved discovering the world of simple complexities found in the plants, the trees, and the flow of Lake Michigan. The summers I spent exploring the woods are a huge influence in my work. Utilizing these memories with my current research and experiences, I seek to create work that references this, but allows the viewer to see their own connection to the natural world. I reference specific plants and other organic forms found in nature, placing them into the context of familiarity and functionality that ceramic processes allow.”

Abby Callaghan

Abby Callaghan

Abby Callaghan: “Many objects are designed to function without regard for how they are perceived, aesthetically or otherwise. This results in somewhat obscure objects or structures, functioning perfectly while being quietly overlooked. For example, I think of the strange holes in the retaining wall by my apartment, whose purpose is simply for drainage. Some objects imply a history of function, like the layers of staples left in the sides of telephone poles, seeming purposeful enough to retain some other meaning beyond simply holding garage sale signs. The texture of wood, along with evenly spaced holes, left in the walls of many cast concrete buildings have an particular aesthetic, but speak more of the necessary process with which they were built. Why do radio towers look the way they do? What are the meanings behind the neon spray paint markings at construction sites? Really, it does not matter to the makers of these objects and structures how or if they are understood by the average person, but that they serve their purpose.
I am interested in making functional, interactive ceramic pieces that reference these peculiar configurations. By utilizing obscure visual aesthetics on interactive work, I aim to encourage the user to think and physically investigate the work to understand its purpose. My goal is to inspire curiosity and a drive for exploration”

Hunter Garr Pace

Hunter Garr Pace

Hunter Garr Pace: I’m mostly influenced by artwork from the Romantic Era, also known as The Beautiful Era in France and in the filthy Victorians in England. In in United States it was known as the Gilded Age because some Americans noticed that everything was very artificial. Artwork from this time period is pink and ripe. The gilding’s very intricate. The depiction of nature and the deep forest is sublime. It’s too good but it also almost doesn’t quite live up to the real thing. It promotes fantasy as well as suggests hidden danger. It’s very seductive. I’m interested in the concept of being lost in the woods, hiding, or getting eaten by wolves. I’m also interested in the concept of surprise, in strange insects, medicinal plants, Japanese Ukiyo-e prints, Germanic fairytales, classical music, and in anime. I think these mediums are very subversive.”

Raegan Koepsel

Raegan Koepsel

Raegan Koepsel: “My work approaches the concept of experimentation through the handling of form and treatment of physical and visual surface. The dynamism of form is emphasized through mark making and administration of glaze with a deliquesce appearance. The experimentation also translates to the functionality of the objects, as one must access the utilitarian objects through new conventions of use.”

Share

Showing 1–15 of 29 results